What Can Diabetic Patients Expect From Cataract Surgery?

VA Outcomes and Prognostic Factors Following Phacoemulsification Cataract Surgery in Patients with Diabetes In Denmark, investigators performed a cohort study to assess visual acuity outcomes after phacoemulsification cataract surgery in a large population of diabetic patients with all degrees of diabetic retinopathy. This review of prospectively collected data comprised patients who had small-incision phacoemulsification cataract surgery between 1999 and 2008 (10 years) according to the Danish National Patient Registry. The investigators...

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Are You Thinking About LASIK? Weigh all of the options!

A great overview from the AAO is as follows: LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) is an outpatientrefractive surgery procedure used to treat nearsightedness,farsightedness and astigmatism. A laser is used to reshape the cornea — the clear, round dome at the front of the eye — to improve the way the eye focuses light rays onto the retina at the back of the eye. With LASIK, an ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) creates a thin flap in the cornea using either a blade or a laser. The surgeon folds back the flap and precisely removes a very...

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14th Annual VISX Laser Certification Course at the Duke Center for Vision Correction

The Refractive Surgery program at the Duke Eye Center and the Duke Center for Vision Correction successfully completed the 14th annual VISX Laser Certification Course making it now the longest running “in house” program in the nation for training and certifying surgeons to perform PRK and LASIK using the VISX Laser.  Alan Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology at Duke has given this program each year at Duke which begins with a 5 hour didactic session reviewing 252 slides and quizzing the participants along the way to make sure...

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Reflecting on my time with Sir Harold Ridley and the present debate over Monofocal vs Multifocal IOLs

    The great debate: Monofocal vs. multifocal by Jena Passut EyeWorld Staff Writer Ever since Nov. 29, 1949, when Sir Harold Ridley, M.D., F.R.S., first successfully implanted an IOL in a patient in a London hospital, surgeons have researched, debated, and sometimes obsessed over the best surgical lens to use. Nearly 62 years later and after many advances in the surgical technique and the lenses themselves, the discussion continues—this time over multifocal versus monofocal IOL implants for presbyopia correction. While monofocal...

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Cataract Surgery Delayed in Countries Offering Socialized Medicine

Cataracts sufferers forced to wait longer for treatment Hundreds of thousands of people with cataracts will have to wait longer for treatment due to cost-cutting changes by health authorities, a survey indicates. A poll of GPs has found more than a quarter of them (27 per cent) said recent changes to qualifying criteria by primary care trusts meant patients would have to wait for their eyesight to deteriorate further before getting surgery on the NHS. Some 720,000 people are diagnosed with cataracts each month, which leave sufferers with...

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“Should I discontinue my blood thinner before I have cataract surgery?”

Multiple studies over the past 2 decades repeatedly demonstrate that the risks associated with discontinuation of coumadin and antiplatelet therapy in patient at high risk for thrombotic or embolic events exceed  the risks associated with excessive bleeding during surgery.  The attached recent study is one more study that affirms this.  Patients needing more involved surgery, such as cases anticipating sutured IOLs, vitrectomy, membrane pealing, etc; however, may need to hold antiplatelet therapy in advance of this nonroutine surgery. Risk...

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