Panuveitis Treated with Cataract Surgery, Intraocular Lens Insertion, Synechialysis, Retisert Steroid Implant, and Glaucoma Filtration Tube

 

Panuveitis can be one of the most challenging problems in Ophthalmic Surgery as this type of severe and pervasive inflammation can affect multiple aspects of the eye resulting in loss of vision.  This particular patient needs the Retisert steroid implant for the treatment of severe inflammatory complications.  Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service at the Duke Eye Center in Durham, NC works closely with Glenn Jaffe, MD and Pratap Challa MD to treat this patient with removal of scar tissue (synechialysis and removal of pupillary membrane), cataract removal, intraocular lens […]

By |August 12th, 2012|Blog, Cataract Surgery, Duke Eye Center, Glaucoma, Retina, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Leading Eye Surgeons Gather to Teach the 8th Annual Harvard Cataract Course

Leading eye surgeons selected by their peers as best teachers / surgeons from 28 Universities gathered to teach the 8th Annual Harvard Cataract Course under course directors Roberto Pineda II, M.D. and Sherleen Chen, M.D from Mass Eye and Ear Infirmary.  The course, given over two days included Dr. Natalie Afshari, Professor of Ophthalmology at Duke Eye Center addressing the importance of intraocular lens calculations.  Dr.  Barry Seibel lectured on Phaco settings and Fluidics and Dr. Bob Avery gave a meticulous discussion on Phaco Chop techniques.  Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive […]

By |May 22nd, 2012|Cataract Surgery, Duke Eye Center|0 Comments

Pupillary Circlage: Repairing the Permanently Dilated Traumatic Pupil During Cataract Surgery

There are a number of potential injuries that can occur to the eye producing the permanently dilated pupil.  Infection, angle closure glaucoma, previous surgery, and blunt trauma can all produce this problem.  The permanently dilated pupil is more likely to produce unwanted glare, brightness during the day, and halos around oncoming headlights.  This functional impact may also include a cosmetic problem as well in patients that have a light colored iris  making the problem of anisocoria more apparent. Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service at the Duke Eye Center in […]

By |April 30th, 2012|Blog, Cataract Surgery, Duke Eye Center, Glaucoma|0 Comments

Ceremonial Ground-Breaking for New Duke Eye Center Clinical Facility

Thanks to Bill and Kathy Hudson and LC Industries for their generosity toward the new state-of-the-art clinical Duke Eye Center in Durham, NC. 

From: Victor J. Dzau, M.D., Chancellor for Health Affairs; CEO, DUHS

Subject: Ceremonial Ground-Breaking for New Eye Center Clinical Facility
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This morning we held a ground-breaking ceremony for a new, state-of-the-art Duke Eye Center building that will add much-needed clinical examination space and enhance the patient experience.

The ceremony celebrated the team effort that has turned this dream of building a new Eye Center clinical facility into a reality. Thanks to the collaborative efforts of our legion of generous donors, […]

Cataract Surgery Pearls for Treating the Patient with Small, Poorly Dilating Pupils

Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service at the Duke Eye Center was asked by Cataract and Refractive Surgery Today to review and edit the surgical “pearls” used for successful cataract surgery in patients with small, poorly dilating pupils.  Patients undergoing cataract surgery with small pupils pose additional risk for potential complications.  It is important to establish prior to surgery the ability to dilate the patient and factors that may hinder dilation.  Identifying predisposing factors such as tamusolin (Flomax) usage or the condition of pseudoexfoliation is particularly important.  Intraoperative “epi-Shugarcaine” is […]

By |March 18th, 2012|Blog, Cataract Surgery, Duke Eye Center|0 Comments

Cataract Surgery in Patients with Keratoconus

Keratoconus (KC) patients frequently seek the benefits of Intacs Intracorneal Ring Segments (ICRS) as these devices improve the corneal curvature (topography) and also in many patients remarkably slows down the progression of KC, making corneal transplantation less likely.  Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Services at the Duke Eye Center in Durham, North Carolina sees a large number of patients with Keratoconus from Raleigh and Durham and Chapel Hill and has wondered if Keratoconus may be more prevalent in North Carolina in comparison to other regions.  One question that always comes […]

By |March 5th, 2012|Blog, Cataract Surgery, Duke Eye Center, Keratoconus|0 Comments

Combining Cataract and Glaucoma Surgery in a Single “Combined” Procedure

Combining cataract and glaucoma surgery in a single procedure is not new.  Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service at the Duke Eye Center in Durham, NC has the enormous privilege of working along with one of the top Glaucoma Services in managing patients that have co-existing Glaucoma along with cataracts and corneal problems.  A “best practices” approach to patients that simultaneously have visually significant cataracts along with poorly controlled glaucoma is to combine cataract surgery with trabeculectomy.  Drs. James Kim and Rand Allingham of the Glaucoma Service at the Duke […]

By |February 29th, 2012|Blog, Cataract Surgery, Duke Eye Center, Glaucoma, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Cataract Surgery: Small Pupil, Floppy Iris Syndrome, but no History of Flomax

Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service at the Duke Eye Center routinely sees several patients each week who have been treated with Flomax prior to cataract surgery.  He strongly recommends obtaining a detailed history for Flomax usage prior to performing cataract surgery.  Flomax (Tamsulosin Hyrdrochloride) is an alpha receptor antagonist used primarily in male patients to relax the sphincter muscle impacted by an enlarged prostate.  While the medication is helpful in treating urinary retention, it has the undesired side effect of acting on the dilator sphincter muscle of the iris […]

By |February 27th, 2012|Blog, Cataract Surgery, Duke Eye Center|0 Comments

A Passion for Caring and Serving the Durham Community

I commend Matthew Hodges and all of the folks at First Baptist Church in downtown Durham, NC for running the health fair for the past 12 years reaching out to a significant number of individuals making up the local community who have inadequate access or means for much needed healthcare.  Yesterday was remarkable for not merely the number of patients we saw, in excess of 60 evaluated for cataracts, glaucoma, pterygia, corneal problems, and retinal and optic nerve problems – but in the number of patients who were under-treated for their glaucoma.  Glaucoma is insidious, silently stealing peripheral vision, often […]

By |February 19th, 2012|Blog, Cataract Surgery, Dry Eye, Duke Eye Center, Glaucoma, Retina|0 Comments

The Dry Eye Patient 4-Months After LipiFlow Thermal Pulsation Therapy

Early results representing my clinical observations and also the subjective response of several patients after treatment have overall led me to believe that the LipiFlow Thermal Pulsation device from TearScience has been one of the most worthwhile additions to my clinical practice in recent years.  Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service at the Duke Eye Center in Durham, NC subspecializes in cataract surgery, corneal transplantation, and laser vision correction (LASIK) and as studied optimizing surgical outcomes for best practices and recognizes that the treatment of symptomatic dry eye syndromes is […]