February222017

Chronic Dry Eye Syndrome – A Patient’s Perspective and Testimonial

By |February 22nd, 2017|Blog, Caring For Your Eyes, Dry Eye, Other Eye Conditions, Uncategorized|0 Comments

10 years ago, if you complained of redness, dryness, irritation, and a feeling of “tired” eyes, I would have likely told you that you are not making enough tears.  It is only recently that we have realized that these symptoms are a result, NOT from tear quantity, NOT from tear production, but rather, a result of poor tear quality – leading to tear film instability and inflammation, a result from an inadequate and improper contribution from the oil/lipid-producing meibomian glands.  Fortunately there is a painless, safe, effective, FDA-approved, 12-minute treatment that is remarkably beneficial in treating this problem that is […]

February192017

The Pupil – why is it called the pupil?

By |February 19th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

The online etymology dictionary goes back to the 14th century.  However, if we dig a little deeper, we can go back much further.  In the ancient Hebrew over 3000 years ago, we find the word כְּאִישׁ֥וֹן

This is a masculine noun that in modern pronunciation would be ishon (ee-shone’) and is felt to mean “little man” presumably from the reflection seen during ancient examination limited by the technology of that era.  It was considered of great value as it was concluded that sight corresponded to this specific location of the eye.

This highly valued association with sight was eventually tied to the […]

February162017

Needle Driver Designed to Make Eye Surgery More Precise and Efficient

By |February 16th, 2017|Cataracts, Corneal Transplants, Duke Eye Center, Uncategorized|0 Comments

While much of our surgery in Ophthalmology has moved away from needing sutures, there are still procedures that require very delicate suturing, including corneal transplant procedures, deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty, traumatic injuries, sutured intraocular lens implants, and other procedures.  I am grateful to Doug Mastel and the great folks at John Weiss & Son International for their help in bringing into production the Carlson-Troutman needle holder that serves as an extremely precise needle driver while simultaneously serving as a tying forcep – allowing the passage of a needle and also tying the suture without exchanging instrumentation – improving efficiency, precision, […]

August122016

Panuveitis Treated with Cataract Surgery, Intraocular Lens Insertion, Synechialysis, Retisert Steroid Implant, and Glaucoma Filtration Tube

By |August 12th, 2016|Blog, Cataracts, Duke Eye Center, Glaucoma, Retina, Uncategorized|0 Comments

 

Panuveitis can be one of the most challenging problems in Ophthalmic Surgery as this type of severe and pervasive inflammation can affect multiple aspects of the eye resulting in loss of vision.  This particular patient needs the Retisert steroid implant for the treatment of severe inflammatory complications.  Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service at the Duke Eye Center in Durham, NC works closely with Glenn Jaffe, MD and Pratap Challa MD to treat this patient with removal of scar tissue (synechialysis and removal of pupillary membrane), cataract removal, intraocular lens […]

May142012

Seven Scientific Posters Sponsored by TearScience at ARVO Advance Understanding of Evaporative Dry Eye to Improve Patient Care

By |May 14th, 2012|Blog, Dry Eye, Duke Eye Center, LASIK, Uncategorized|0 Comments

TearScience Inc. announced that it sponsored research for seven scientific posters on evaporative dry eye and its technology at ARVO. Subjects reflect new, ongoing research on the disease, TearScience’s technology, and clinical outcomes. The posters cover topics such as how the LipiFlow Thermal Pulsation System can rejuvenate Meibomian gland secretions for up to a year as well as LipiFlow’s efficacy and safety over warm compress therapy for treating Meibomian gland dysfunction. Another demonstrates LipiView Ocular Surface Interferometer’s ability to consistently and accurately measure the thickness of thin film, optically similar to the tear film. Additional research presented increases the general […]

February292012

Combining Cataract and Glaucoma Surgery in a Single “Combined” Procedure

By |February 29th, 2012|Blog, Cataracts, Duke Eye Center, Glaucoma, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Combining cataract and glaucoma surgery in a single procedure is not new.  Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service at the Duke Eye Center in Durham, NC has the enormous privilege of working along with one of the top Glaucoma Services in managing patients that have co-existing Glaucoma along with cataracts and corneal problems.  A “best practices” approach to patients that simultaneously have visually significant cataracts along with poorly controlled glaucoma is to combine cataract surgery with trabeculectomy.  Drs. James Kim and Rand Allingham of the Glaucoma Service at the Duke […]

February122012

Back to Back Wins for Duke Basketball – Just How DId It Happen?

By |February 12th, 2012|Blog, Duke Eye Center, Refractive Surgery, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service at the Duke Eye Center in Durham, NC along with Ophthalmic Technician, Adam Staley explain what it takes to prepare for a Duke Basketball game.  Whether playing or watching, in Cameron Indoor Stadium, the key is to be “in the game.”  That means full, all-out engagement in the moment.  Here is how Adam and Big Al prepare for the big game!

February82012

Special Considerations In Treating Patients with Advanced or Dense Cataracts

By |February 8th, 2012|Blog, Cataracts, Duke Eye Center, Uncategorized|0 Comments

 

What special or additional considerations are needed when managing the patient with a particularly dense cataract?  Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service at the Duke Eye Center in Durham, NC is frequently asked this question by patients as well as trainees and it begins with the preoperative assessment.  A dense lens will require more energy to remove it so making sure the zonular support is adequate and that the corneal endothelial cell density is appropriate as these patients will likely have more corneal edema after surgery requiring a longer period […]

January172012

Corneal Transplantation (Keratoplasty) Using the DSAEK Technique in the Multitube Hypotonous Glaucoma Patient

By |January 17th, 2012|Blog, Corneal Transplants, Duke Eye Center, Keratoconus, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Glaucoma, previous filtering tube surgery, and hypotony are ALL risk factors for DSAEK surgery and increase the risk of donor tissue detachment.  Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service at the Duke Eye Center demonstrates the techniques behind successful corneal transplantation using the DSAEK (Descemets Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty  technique that ultimately required transcorneal sutures to secure the donor tissue.  THis particular patient had low intraocular pressure and repeated detachments eventually needing sutures to accomplish success!

December52011

Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSAEK) at Duke Eye Center by Alan N. Carlson, M.D.

By |December 5th, 2011|Blog, Cataracts, Corneal Transplants, Duke Eye Center, Keratoconus, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Alan N. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Chief of the Corneal and Refractive Surgery Service of the Duke Eye Center was inspired by the “Friends of Fuchs” organization and the feedback from his presentation was overwhelming.  In follow up, he shares the following video demonstrating his technique for Corneal Transplantation (using the DSEK, DSAEK technique) combined with cataract surgery and intraocular lens insertion.  This particular patient was considering retirement due to her poor vision and also because surgery is a significant part of her occupation.  She is now re-thinking that decision as her vision from her first eye is […]