EYE DROPS: Use only one drop at a time and wait a few minutes between drops to avoid diluting the previous drop.

Bring your post op kit with you on your one-day visit.

 

VIGAMOX ECONOPRED OR OMNIPRED NEVANAC OR XiBROM or BromDay
ANTIBIOTIC (tan top) STEROID (typically has a pink top) 

shake this medicine up – milky consistency

Reduces discomfort and also adds to controlling inflammation
 

 

 

FOUR TIMES A DAY FOR ONE WEEK

 

FOUR TIMES A DAY FOR WEEK ONE

THREE TIMES A DAY FOR WEEK TWO

TWO TIMES A DAY FOR WEEK THREE

ONE TIME A DAY FOR WEEK FOUR

 

 

TWO TIMES A DAY UNTIL THE BOTTLE RUNS OUT

 

Resume all oral medications the day after surgery

In your non-operative eye – resume using all of your eye medicines

 

Eye Protection: (These all apply during the first week after surgery)

  • Do not rub, bump or forcibly squeeze your eyes.
  • Wear wrap-around sunglasses when you are outside in bright light to reduce sensitivity and also for protection.
  • Wear the eye shield when you sleep.  Apply at bedtime with paper tape (gentle on skin).  Use 3M Transpore tape if your skin is unusually oily.  Use the shield longer than a week if you have eye rubbing tendencies.

 

Restrictions:

  • Avoid any strenuous activities including exercise that causes you to hold your breath or lifting more than 40 pounds during the first week.
  • Bending over is fine but again, use common sense and avoid excessive straining.
  • Avoid hot tubs, saunas and swimming pools for two weeks after surgery.
  • Showering and washing your face is permitted (but try to avoid getting soap and water directly in the eye).
  • Resuming sexual activities – wait until you get out of the Eye Center parking lot.
  • Avoid driving a car for the first 36 hours after surgery as some of the sedatives can slow down reaction time during the early period right after surgery.
  • Avoid a heavy meal immediately after surgery as this can lead to an upset stomach.
  • Avoid applying eyelid makeup (mascara, eye liner, foundation, eye shadow) during the first week after surgery.
  • Reading and computer usage is fine but rest your eyes if you feel fatigued.

 

When to Call:

  • It is unusual to have severe pain following cataract surgery. Pain that is not relieved with Tylenol or Ibuprofen is a reason to call immediately.
  • Vision gradually clears during the first few days after surgery; however vision should not get worse or darken. Please call with any unusual symptoms.
  • Flashing lights, new floaters, or a curtain over the vision should prompt a call to our number below.
  • R.S.V.P. (= Redness, Sensitivity to sunlight, Vision decrease, Pain) are reasons to call us.
  • Above all, use common sense.  If your eye is clearly getting worse, you need to contact us.

 

Stitches? Most patients undergo cataract surgery without sutures or stitches.  At the end of each procedure, I test the wound to make sure that it is secure without leakage.  On occasion (5%), patients during this test might show a tendency to leak.  Therefore, I might use a single suture or stitch to secure the wound to prevent leakage with accidental eye rubbing.  Nylon sutures need to be removed comfortably in the clinic.  Vicryl sutures dissolve at 3 weeks after surgery and therefore do not need to be removed.


Miscellaneous:

  • Remember that a small amount of redness, eyelid swelling, and a difference in pupil size is considered normal in the first 48 hours after surgery.
  • Your prescription for glasses is likely to change significantly after surgery so do not be surprised if your “old” glasses make your vision worse.
  • It is not uncommon after the first eye undergoes surgery for there to be an exaggerated difference in prescription between the two eyes and a sense that the eyes are not working together.
  • It may take a few weeks for your vision to stabilize for a final prescription.
  • While most patients appreciate improvement in vision in the first few days after surgery, it may take several weeks to reap the full benefits of surgery.

 

PLEASE CALL (919)684-8111 AND ASK FOR THE CORNEA FELLOW ON CALL FOR ANY EYE EMERGENCIES (AFTER HOURS).